Bourbon and American Whiskey brands, history, reviews, and opinions
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Bourbon and Whiskey:

History, reviews, opinions and stories about American Whiskeys and what makes them unique..

 

Whiskey sign

 

Types of Whiskey:

Bourbon Whiskey

To legally be called Bourbon in the US, the whiskey must be:

• Made from a mash containing at least 51% but not more than 79% corn. The use of other grains, notably rye, barley and wheat is usually credited with the reason for different brands having a different flavor.*

• Must come out of the still at less than 80% alcohol by volume

• Must be stored in NEW, charred, white oak barrels at 62.5% or less alcohol by volume for a minimum of two years.

 

Tennessee Whiskey

Similar to and often confused with Bourbon, Tennessee whiskey is made with a similar process but it's made in Tennessee and not Kentucky, doesn't use Kentucky Limestone water, and has a different filtration process.

Jack Daniel's is not bourbon; however, it's often served as such.

 

 

Kentucky Bourbon

To be Kentucky Bourbon it must have been make and aged in Kentucky. There only a few bourbons that aren't Kentucky Bourbon.

 

Kentucky Straight Bourbon

To be Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey all of the whiskey in the bottle must not be blended with any other whiskey.

 

American Whiskey

Not aged or not bottled in Kentucky or Tennessee

 

Kentucky Whiskey

Does not meet the requirements of being a Bourbon.

 

Rye Whiskey

Mash containing at least 51% rye gain.

 

Canadian Whiskey

Must be mashed, distilled, and aged in Canada. If sold in the Canada it must be aged at least three years in a wooden barrel of less than 700 Liter (185 US gallons) capacity. The barrels to not have to be new or charred. Most Canadian Whiskey is Rye Whiskey and most are blends of more than one Canadian Whiskey.

 

Scotch Whiskey

We won't be taking very much about Scotch Whiskey. The distilling method used for Scotch is the Grand Daddy of Bourbon. There the similarity ends. Scotch is made from Barley. The water is peaty. Ageing is done in USED Bourbon or Sherry barrels. In the US, drinking Scotch is a social status thing.

 

Other Spirits

Krupnikas - Baltic Style Liqueur

 


 

* This is just marketing hype. All whiskey comes off the still as nothing but alcohol and water - pure "moonshine". Ingredients have little, if anything, to do with the flavor. The wood the barrel is make from, how charcoaled the barrel is, how long it's aged, the climate where it's aged, whether or not the barrels are rotated during aging, new vs. used barrels and the water that's added are what determine the flavor. In the case of Tennessee whisky, you can also add how much charcoal is added to the barrel in the name of "filtering".